Do this: In thirty seconds, name all the famous prophets and preachers in the Bible that come to your mind.

Now, in no more than thirty seconds name all the worship leaders you know of in the Bible (who were famous because they directed or played music).

The list is quite a bit shorter, isn’t it? How many did you think of? One, two, any at all?

In reality, the only “worship leader” that comes even remotely close to the fame and recognition of the Bible preachers and prophets is Asaph. And his reputation was known mostly among spiritual leaders and those in his own peer group, particularly the Levites.

Basically, here’s the scoop: Preachers got a lot of recognition from both God and people but musicians apparently didn’t. Let’s get real honest with each other now. Doesn’t that bother you a little? Somehow that just doesn’t seem right. I mean, after all, we do a lot of the work. We’re the ones that make the preacher “look good” on Sunday morning! Don’t we get at least an honorable mention?

Nope.

Here’s why, as best I can see it: The more recognition and popularity we as music and worship leaders get showered, the more difficult it is for us to point starry-eyed people away from us and up to the Father. That is, in the end, the essence of worship, you know. By the very nature of our “business,” we must help people fall in love with Him and only Him…WorshipCoverfrontweb.jpg